Why we (almost) did not write the Lean IT Field Guide

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After writing the book Lean IT in 2011, we were amazed by the the response: a great deal of “pent up demand” and interest in applying the principles, methods, and tools of lean to IT operations. This lead to speaking engagements all over the world, webinars and papers, and a number of major opportunities to deploy lean IT in both large and medium-size companies. Like any lean experience, it was journey of trail and discovery with both success and setback, and much was learned.

As I met people in the US, Europe, Asia, and Australia, I heard a common request, “I loved the book and it has changed the way I view the function and purpose of IT and the people I work with, but… [it is always what people say after the but that is most critical!]. What followed was always some form of, “but how do we actually do it?” or “What are the steps we take to introduce and mobilize Lean IT throughout our organization?”

For several years I dismissed this request because I had been taught that people learn lean by going through the often-painful process of trying something, getting knocked down, reflecting, and trying again, until they come to understand that all of lean is a learning system based on the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust method. If we were to direct people in what to do and the sequence to do it, two problems would transpire: 1) without knowing in detail the distinctive challenges of their organization, we were not in a position of understanding to suggest a course of action, and 2) by providing such a roadmap for transformation, we would rob them of the hands-on learning experience essential to lean thinking and effective change.

Mike has had the amazing opportunity to apply lean IT at a number companies including Nike, Con-way, ANZ, Aggreko, Nationwide, and Motorists. After over twenty years of learning and struggling to be a lean thinker, it became apparent that we could share the essential elements of successful lean IT deployments in a way that would not violate either of our concerns. By keeping the roadmap at a level that would be universally applicable, there is ample opportunity for adaptation, experimentation, discovery, and learning so the reader can still experience the journey of lean IT! In fact, many of our readers have emailed to say that the book is equally effective in others areas of the business including the front office, HR, purchasing, Finance, transaction-based processing, analytical work, and even manufacturing. This is not surprising to us – these ideas are based on timeless universal principles which apply well beyond IT.

Applying our roadmap, Tom spearheaded the lean IT transformation at Nationwide with incredible success. In its seventh year, lean IT has delivered a new culture of performance, transparency, and more productive, better quality, and lower costs!

We hope that The Lean IT Field Guide inspires your journey in IT and beyond!

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